1999 Charger R/T Concept

1999 Charger R/T Concept

 

The Charger badge had been missing from the American car market for nearly 12 years when Dodge introduced a totally new concept vehicle bearing the well-known nameplate: the 1999 Charger R/T.

 

This new Charger was a bold departure in a number of ways. First, it had four doors. All previous Chargers had been two-door coupes. This was also the lightest, lowest and sleekest Charger yet, only 187 inches long, with a curb weight of 3,000 pounds—more than 650 pounds lighter than earlier Chargers. The concept shared a common…

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1999 Charger R/T Concept

1930 Dodge Brothers DD Taxicab

1930 Dodge Brothers DD Taxicab

With their reputation for ruggedness and reliability, Dodge Brothers cars were favorites for taxicab use. Take this handsome 1930 DD Series Sedan, for instance.

 

The 1930 model year was the last in which the full Dodge Brothers name was officially used. The Dodge brothers, John F. and Horace E., had passed away in 1920. In 1928, the company became part of Chrysler. Beginning in 1931, Brothers was dropped from the name and the cars were marketed simply as Dodges. (The name change was applied to trucks the year before.) However,…

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1930 Dodge Brothers DD Taxicab

1950 Dodge Coronet Diplomat

1950 Dodge Coronet Diplomat

 

In 1949-50, a hot new fad was sweeping through the auto industry: the hardtop convertible. Here’s Dodge’s contribution to the styling trend, the 1950 Coronet Diplomat.

 

When first you hear it, the term “hardtop convertible” sounds like an oxymoron—like “constant variable” or “jumbo shrimp.” Hold on, and we’ll make some sense of it. In the late ’40s, industry product planners discovered that many new car buyers, especially young people, purchased convertibles but then seldom if ever took down the tops. Perplexed by this curious fact—convertibles were significantly more…

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1950 Dodge Coronet Diplomat