1969 Coronet Super Bee

1969 Coronet Super Bee

 

As a member of the Dodge Scat Pack lineup, the Coronet Super Bee was a perfect fit: The bumblebee tail stripes and cartoon bee mascot were standard equipment. The concept was wildly popular—in fact, you can still buy a Super Bee today.

 

The Super Bee was introduced in mid-1968, and to tell the whole story, it wasn’t a Dodge original. At the start of the model year, Dodge’s sister brand Plymouth launched a new kind of muscle car called the Road Runner. This model took the lightest, lowest-price…

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1969 Coronet Super Bee

1999 Charger R/T Concept

1999 Charger R/T Concept

 

The Charger badge had been missing from the American car market for nearly 12 years when Dodge introduced a totally new concept vehicle bearing the well-known nameplate: the 1999 Charger R/T.

 

This new Charger was a bold departure in a number of ways. First, it had four doors. All previous Chargers had been two-door coupes. This was also the lightest, lowest and sleekest Charger yet, only 187 inches long, with a curb weight of 3,000 pounds—more than 650 pounds lighter than earlier Chargers. The concept shared a common…

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1999 Charger R/T Concept

1930 Dodge Brothers DD Taxicab

1930 Dodge Brothers DD Taxicab

With their reputation for ruggedness and reliability, Dodge Brothers cars were favorites for taxicab use. Take this handsome 1930 DD Series Sedan, for instance.

 

The 1930 model year was the last in which the full Dodge Brothers name was officially used. The Dodge brothers, John F. and Horace E., had passed away in 1920. In 1928, the company became part of Chrysler. Beginning in 1931, Brothers was dropped from the name and the cars were marketed simply as Dodges. (The name change was applied to trucks the year before.) However,…

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1930 Dodge Brothers DD Taxicab