Tag Archives: muscle car

Feeding 840 Hungry Horses: Re-Imagining the Air-Grabber™ Hood Scoop

One of the 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT® Demon’s most striking visual cues is its massive hood scoop — the largest functional hood scoop opening offered on any production car. Positioned optimally near the leading edge of the hood, its purpose is to direct cool, dense outside air to the HEMI® engine’s 2.7-liter supercharger.  
 

 

We talked with Demon development engineer Jim Wilder to discover how the menacing scoop came into existence. He told us, “The guys responsible for the actual design are Mark Trostle and Nicho Vardis. These guys have a…

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Feeding 840 Hungry Horses: Re-Imagining the Air-Grabber™ Hood Scoop

Demon Confidential – A Flare for the Original

In this fourth (in a series of 10) Demon Confidential blog, let’s take a look at one of the Demon’s most unique visual aspects, the four-corner fender extension flares. They’re present because of Demon’s massive P315/40R18 Nitto NT05R drag radial tires. Nearly 2 inches wider than the Hellcat’s P275/40R20 Pirelli P Zero Nero, these ultra-grippy tires represent the first ever installation of D.O.T. approved drag radials on a mass-produced new car right from the factory.*  
 

 

But if the Challenger SRT® Demon is a rear-wheel-drive car, why does it have these…

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Demon Confidential – A Flare for the Original

Less Is More, Exploring the Demon’s “Monoposto” Interior

Over at Ferrari there’s a long history of “monoposto” vehicle construction. Translated from the Italian language, the term identifies a single-seat race car and was first used in 1931 to designate a new classification for single-seat racers. Previously, many European race-sanctioning bodies required two seats, one for the driver and one for a riding mechanic. Really!  
 


 

The 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT® Demon takes all of this a step further, being the first mass-produced American muscle car to come standard with a single bucket seat for the driver. Demon Development Engineer Jim…

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Less Is More, Exploring the Demon’s “Monoposto” Interior