The Dodge Heritage Series: Part 10, Overview & Conclusion

1973 Dodge Challenger

Welcome back to the Dodge Heritage Series, a 10-part exploration of Dodge brand history. The goal of this installment — the final in the series (for now!) — is to provide a short description of, and easy navigation to, the nine previous Heritage Series posts. Thank you for reading, and enjoy!

 

The Dodge Heritage Series: Part 1, 1914–1929

The official history of the Dodge automobile begins in 1914, but the story of the Dodge brothers in the automobile business reaches back even further. John and Horace Dodge were among the pioneers of the Detroit auto industry. (Click here to continue reading)

 

The Dodge Heritage Series: Part 2, 1930–1939

By 1930, the operations of the former Dodge Brothers Company were fully integrated into the Chrysler Corporation, with Dodge offering an exciting new lineup of advanced six- and eight-cylinder models. (Click here to continue reading)

 

The Dodge Heritage Series: Part 3, 1940–1949

The Dodge brand entered the 1940s in the same way as the rest of America: with a new sense of confidence and optimism. Slowly but surely, the country was lifting itself out of the Great Depression. (Click here to continue reading)

 

The Dodge Heritage Series: Part 4, 1950–1959

In the 1950s, the Dodge lineup featured a long, impressive list of engineering innovations and bold, new styling that led the American auto industry. (Click here to continue reading)

 

The Dodge Heritage Series: Part 5, 1960–1969

The 1960s were a memorable time for Dodge. It was the golden age of the American muscle car, and Dodge was on the cutting edge of performance, engineering and styling and would lead the way in producing some of the most exciting cars of the era. (Click here to continue reading)

 

The Dodge Heritage Series: Part 6, 1970–1979

As Dodge responded to shifting consumer desires, change was the one constant for the brand in the 1970s. The model roster for 1972 included the compact Dart and Demon; the sporty Charger and Challenger; the mid-size, family-oriented Coronet sedan and the full-sized Polara and Monaco. But by 1979, the lineup had an entirely new look. (Click here to continue reading)

 

The Dodge Heritage Series: Part 7, 1980–1989

The 1980s at Dodge featured two key products that changed the brand and the industry forever: the K-car and the minivan. (Click here to continue reading)

 

The Dodge Heritage Series: Part 8, 1990–1999

The 1990s brought a new vision at Dodge, with fresh ideas and a vibrant new product line. The roster of all-new models, marketed as “The New Dodge,” included the Viper, Durango and Intrepid, to name but a few. (Click here to continue reading)

 

The Dodge Heritage Series: Part 9, 2000–2014

The 21st century brought the Dodge brand a whole new set of challenges, with consumers in search of ever greater performance and efficiency. Dodge responded with a new generation HEMI® V-8 engine and an advanced line of vehicles to match. (Click here to continue reading)

 

Now that our first 100 years are in the books, we’re excited to turn our attention to the next 100. See how the second century of Dodge begins at www.Dodge.com.

 


  • epicurus

    Thanks, I enjoyed reading all the parts.

  • Josh Aaron

    Absolutely love how Dodge is keeping the American tradition alive in the Heritage series. Here’s some additional information regarding the history of the American muscle car and how it has evolved over time. Includes some neat info about Dodge and Mopar throughout the years: http://www.carfax.com/blog/american-muscle-car-grew/